Virginia's CTE Resource Center - Workplace Readiness Skills

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate effective reading and writing skills.

Definition

Demonstration includes
  • reading and correctly interpreting workplace documents (e.g., instructional manuals, work orders, invoices, memorandums)
  • writing clear, correct language, appropriate to audience.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What level of reading is required on the job?
  • Would you like to raise your reading level? Why, or why not? How could you improve your reading skills?
  • What level of writing skills do you need to hold a technical job? A professional-level job?
  • What writing skills do you need to improve? What resources are available to help you?
  • How do reading and writing skills directly impact your nonoccupational activities? (In other words, how can competent skill levels of reading and writing help you succeed as an individual, as a family member, as a citizen?)
  • Can technology help you improve your writing skills? If so, how?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  • Use text structures such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information in both print and digital texts.
  • Use prior knowledge and build additional background knowledge as context for new learning.
  • Identify questions to be answered.
  • Make, confirm, or revise predictions.
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  • Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  • Identify the main idea.
  • Summarize supporting details.
  • Compare and contrast information about one topic, which may be contained in different selections.
  • Identify the author’s organizational pattern.
  • Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

6.7

The student will write narration, description, exposition, and persuasion.
  • Identify audience and purpose.
  • Use a variety of prewriting strategies including graphic organizers to generate and organize ideas.
  • Organize writing structure to fit mode or topic.
  • Establish a central idea and organization.
  • Compose a topic sentence or thesis, statement if appropriate.
  • Write multiparagraph compositions with elaboration and unity.
  • Select vocabulary and information to enhance the central idea, tone, and voice.
  • Expand and embed ideas by using modifiers, standard coordination, and subordination in complete sentences.
  • Revise sentences for clarity of content, including specific vocabulary and information.
  • Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

6.8

The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  • Use a variety of graphic organizers including sentence diagrams to analyze and improve sentence formation and paragraph structure.
  • Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.
  • Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include indefinite pronouns.
  • Maintain consistent verb tense across paragraphs.
  • Eliminate double negatives.
  • Use quotation marks with dialogue.
  • Choose adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
  • Use correct spelling for frequently used words.

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  • Use prior and background knowledge as a context for new learning.
  • Use text structures to aid comprehension.
  • Identify an author’s organizational pattern, using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information.
  • Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  • Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of a text.
  • Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  • Identify the main idea.
  • Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  • Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Organize and synthesize information for use in written formats.
  • Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

7.7

The student will write in a variety of forms with an emphasis on exposition, narration, and persuasion.
  • Identify intended audience.
  • Use a variety of prewriting strategies including graphic organizers to generate and organize ideas.
  • Organize writing structure to fit mode or topic.
  • Establish a central idea and organization.
  • Compose a topic sentence or thesis statement.
  • Write multiparagraph compositions with unity, elaborating the central idea.
  • Select vocabulary and information to enhance the central idea, tone, and voice.
  • Expand and embed ideas by using modifiers, standard coordination, and subordination in complete sentences.
  • Use clauses and phrases for sentence variety.
  • Revise sentences for clarity of content including specific vocabulary and information.
  • Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

7.8

The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  • Use a variety of graphic organizers, including sentence diagrams, to analyze and improve sentence formation and paragraph structure.
  • Choose appropriate adjectives and adverbs to enhance writing.
  • Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include indefinite pronouns.
  • Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.
  • Edit for verb tense consistency and point of view.
  • Demonstrate understanding of sentence formation by identifying the eight parts of speech and their functions in sentences.
  • Use quotation marks with dialogue.
  • Use correct spelling for commonly used words.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  • Draw on background knowledge and knowledge of text structure to understand selections.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information, using evidence from text as support.
  • Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  • Analyze the author’s use of text structure and word choice.
  • Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  • Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  • Identify the main idea.
  • Summarize text, identifying supporting details.
  • Identify an author’s organizational pattern, using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  • Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and oral formats.
  • Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.7

The student will write in a variety of forms, including narration, exposition, persuasion, and informational.
  1. Identify intended audience.
  2. Use prewriting strategies to generate and organize ideas.
  3. Distinguish between a thesis statement and a topic sentence.
  4. Organize details to elaborate the central idea and provide unity.
  5. Select specific vocabulary and information for audience and purpose.
  6. Use interview quotations as evidence.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, word choice, sentence variety, and transitions between paragraphs.
  8. Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

8.8

The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  1. Use a variety of graphic organizers including sentence diagrams to analyze and improve sentence formation and paragraph structure.
  2. Use and punctuate correctly varied sentence structures to include conjunctions and transition words.
  3. Choose the correct case and number for pronouns in prepositional phrases with compound objects.
  4. Maintain consistent verb tense across paragraphs.
  5. Use comparative and superlative degrees of adverbs and adjectives.
  6. Use quotation marks with dialogue and direct quotations.
  7. Use correct spelling for frequently used words.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  2. Summarize text, relating supporting details.
  3. Understand the purpose of text structures and use those features to locate information and gain meaning from texts.
  4. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  5. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  6. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, or complete a task.
  8. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  9. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  10. Organize and synthesize information from sources for use in written and oral presentations.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

9.6

The student will develop narrative, expository, and persuasive writings for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  1. Generate, gather, and organize ideas for writing.
  2. Plan and organize writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  3. Communicate clearly the purpose of the writing, using a thesis statement where appropriate.
  4. Write clear, varied sentences, using specific vocabulary and information.
  5. Elaborate ideas clearly through word choice and vivid description.
  6. Arrange paragraphs into a logical progression.
  7. Use transitions between paragraphs and ideas.
  8. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.
  9. Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

9.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  1. Use and apply rules for the parts of a sentence, including subject/verb, direct/indirect object,  predicate nominative/predicate adjective, and coordinating conjunctions.
  2. Use parallel structures across sentences and paragraphs.
  3. Use appositives, main clauses, and subordinate clauses.
  4. Use commas and semicolons to distinguish and divide main and subordinate clauses.
  5. Distinguish between active and passive voice.
  6. Proofread and edit writing for intended audience and purpose.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify text organization and structure.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim manuals or informational sources to locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

10.6

The student will develop a variety of writings to persuade, interpret, analyze, and evaluate, with an emphasis on exposition and analysis.
  1. Generate, gather, plan, and organize ideas for writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Synthesize information to support a thesis.
  3. Elaborate ideas clearly through word choice and vivid description.
  4. Write clear and varied sentences, clarifying ideas with precise and relevant evidence.
  5. Organize ideas into a logical sequence, using transitions.
  6. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.
  7. Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

10.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  1. Distinguish between active and passive voice.
  2. Apply rules governing use of the colon.
  3. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.
  4. Differentiate between in-text citations and works cited on the bibliography page.
  5. Analyze the writing of others.
  6. Describe how the author accomplishes the intended purpose of a piece of writing.
  7. Suggest how writing might be improved.
  8. Proofread and edit final product for intended audience and purpose.

11.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and follow directions to complete an application for college admission, for a scholarship, or for employment.
  3. Generalize ideas from selections to make predictions about other texts.
  4. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.
  5. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  6. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  7. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  8. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.

11.6

The student will write in a variety of forms, with an emphasis on persuasion.
  1. Generate, gather, plan, and organize ideas for writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing, developing a thesis that demonstrates knowledgeable judgments, addresses counterclaims, and provides effective conclusions.
  3. Organize ideas in a sustained and logical manner.
  4. Clarify and defend position with precise and relevant evidence, elaborating ideas clearly and accurately.
  5. Adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  6. Revise writing for clarity of content, accuracy, and depth of information.
  7. Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.
  8. Write and revise correspondence to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education.

11.7

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  1. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.
  2. Use verbals and verbal phrases to achieve sentence conciseness and variety.
  3. Distinguish between active and passive voice.
  4. Differentiate between in-text citations and works cited on the bibliography page.
  5. Adjust sentence and paragraph structures for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  6. Proofread and edit writing for intended audience and purpose.

12.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical-thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.
  2. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  3. Analyze two or more texts addressing the same topic to identify authors’ purposes and determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Identify false premises in persuasive writing.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences about explicit and implied information, using textual support.

12.6

The student will develop expository and informational, analytical, and persuasive/argumentative writings.
  1. Generate, gather, and organize ideas for writing to address a specific audience and purpose.
  2. Produce arguments in writing that develop a thesis to demonstrate knowledgeable judgments, address counterclaims, and provide effective conclusions.
  3. Clarify and defend a position with precise and relevant evidence.
  4. Adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation.
  5. Use a variety of rhetorical strategies to accomplish a specific purpose.
  6. Create arguments free of errors in logic and externally supported.
  7. Revise writing for clarity of content, depth of information, and technique of presentation.
  8. Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

12.7

The student will write, revise, and edit writing.
  1. Edit, proofread, and prepare writing for intended audience and purpose.
  2. Apply grammatical conventions to edit writing for correct use of language, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
  3. Use a style manual, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), to apply rules for punctuation and formatting of direct quotations.

Other Related Standards

Instructional Resources for Workplace Readiness Skills

A Process for Writing

Audience, Purpose, and Language Use in Electronic Messages

Business Writing (with Scenarios)

HATS: A Design Procedure for Routine Business Documents

Resumes and Cover Letters for High School Students

Work Etiquette: Business Communication