Virginia's CTE Resource Center - Workplace Readiness Skills

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Definition

Demonstration includes
  • recognizing, analyzing, and solving problems that arise in completing assigned tasks
  • identifying resources that may help solve a specific problem
  • using a logical approach to make decisions and solve problems.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are some examples of problem-solving and decision-making methods, and how are they alike and different?
  • What are the consequences of using a reasoning approach to problem solving and decision making? What are some potential consequences of using a non-reasoning approach?
  • What steps are involved in implementing the solution to a problem?
  • Why do you need to test a solution or decision?

Related Standards of Learning

History and Social Science

CE.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. analyzing information to create diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and spreadsheets;
  4. determining the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias;
  5. constructing informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple sources;
  6. determining multiple cause-and-effect relationships that impact political and economic events;
  7. taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the costs and benefits of a specific choice;
  9. applying civic virtue and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. defending conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from sources.

CE.4

The student will demonstrate personal character traits that facilitate thoughtful and effective participation in civic life by

  1. practicing trustworthiness and honesty;
  2. practicing courtesy and respect for the rights of others;
  3. practicing responsibility, accountability, and self-reliance;
  4. practicing respect for the law;
  5. practicing patriotism;
  6. practicing thoughtful decision making; and
  7. practicing service to the school and/or local community.

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

USI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship, by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify the costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

USII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Other Related Standards

Economics and Personal Finance Standards of Learning

EPF.1

The student will demonstrate knowledge of basic economic concepts and structures by
  1. describing how consumers, businesses, and government decision makers face scarcity of resources and must make trade-offs and incur opportunity costs;
  2. explaining that choices often have long-term unintended consequences;
  3. describing how effective decision making requires comparing the additional costs (marginal costs) and additional benefits (marginal benefits);
  4. identifying factors of production;
  5. comparing the characteristics of market, command, tradition, and mixed economies; and
  6. identifying Adam Smith and describing the characteristics of a market economy.

EPF.11

The student will demonstrate knowledge of planning for living and leisure expenses by
  1. comparing the costs and benefits of purchasing vs. leasing a vehicle;
  2. comparing the advantages and disadvantages of renting vs. purchasing a home;
  3. describing the process of renting housing;
  4. describing the process of purchasing a home;
  5. calculating the cost of utilities, services, maintenance, and other housing expenses; and
  6. evaluating discretionary spending decisions.

EPF.13

The student will demonstrate knowledge of credit and loan functions by
  1. evaluating the various methods of financing a purchase;
  2. analyzing credit card features and their impact on personal financial planning;
  3. identifying qualifications needed to obtain credit;
  4. identifying basic provisions of credit and loan laws;
  5. comparing terms and conditions of various sources of consumer credit;
  6. identifying strategies for effective debt management, including sources of assistance;
  7. explaining the need for a good credit rating;
  8. comparing the costs and conditions of secured and unsecured loans; and
  9. comparing the types of voluntary and involuntary bankruptcy and the implications of each.

EPF.14

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the role of insurance in risk management by
  1. evaluating insurance as a risk management strategy;
  2. distinguishing among the types, costs, and benefits of insurance coverage, including automobile, life, property, health, and professional liability; and
  3. explaining the roles of insurance in financial planning.

EPF.16

The student will demonstrate knowledge of taxes by
  1. describing the types and purposes of local, state, and federal taxes and the way each is levied and used;
  2. exploring how tax structures affect consumers, producers, and business owners differently;
  3. computing local taxes on products and services;
  4. examining potential tax deductions and credits on a tax return;
  5. explaining the content and purpose of a standard W-2 form; and
  6. explaining the similarities and differences between state and federal taxation of inheritances.

EPF.17

The student will demonstrate knowledge of personal financial planning by
  1. identifying short-term and long-term personal financial goals;
  2. identifying anticipated and unanticipated income and expenses;
  3. examining components and purposes of a personal net worth statement;
  4. developing a personal budget;
  5. investigating the effects of government actions and economic conditions on personal financial planning; and
  6. explaining how economics influences a personal financial plan.

EPF.18

The student will demonstrate knowledge of investment and savings planning by
  1. comparing the impact of simple interest vs. compound interest on savings;
  2. comparing and contrasting investment and savings options;
  3. explaining costs and income sources for investments;
  4. examining the fundamental workings of Social Security and the system's effects on retirement planning;
  5. contrasting alternative retirement plans; and
  6. describing how the stock market works.

Instructional Resources for Workplace Readiness Skills

Explore More Guides to Critical Thinking: Problem-Solving Handouts and Worksheets

Exploring Systems Theory

Learning Mathematics through the Problem-Solving Process

Mind Tools: Decision-Making Techniques

Nevada WRS Online Resources: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Over 50 Problem-Solving Strategies Explained

P21’s Critical Thinking and Problem Solving List

PBS Invent It, Build It Activity Guide

Problem Solving

The Problem-Solving Process